Uk Tracks Of The Week: Little Simz, Smiler, Sp

Artists include Little Simz, Smiler, and SP. Little Simz “Deranged” The latest female MC to prick up the ears of the UK’s urban music industry is 19-year-old Little Simz, whose flow is cutesy while the bars are feisty. Her fourth mixtape, Black Canvas, has been co-signed by the likes of BBC Radio 1’s Zane Lowe and the legendary music exec that is Sylvia Rhone, and she continues to tick boxes for many-a-tastemaker. Taken from the aforementioned mixtape, “Deranged” sees Little Simz “blurring the lines between reality and madness” over the instrumental used for Earl Sweatshirt’s “Hive.” And the visuals are just as trippy. Smiler Feat. Blade Brown & Black The Ripper New Day What happens when you put a back-in-the-day-style lyricist, a road rapper, and a conscious-minded MC on a mellow hip-hop production? Smiler, Blade Brown, and Black The Ripper with “New Day” thats what. On Smilers The Coming mixtape track, each rhymer opens up about their climb in music, with Black The Ripper taking the prize for standout line: “You dont know about my independent grind/Underrated, underestimated, and Im unsigned.” SP & FuntCase Feat. Hitman Liars V.I.P Nothing beats screwface-inducing grime like SP, FuntCase, and Hitmans “Liars V.I.P”: straight-up raw aggression, unashamed braggadocio, and the dirtiest beat. The Midlands seems to finally be getting the recognition it deserves for its grime talent. About time, too.

Research and Markets: UK Domestic B2B Express Parcels Distribution Survey 2012

The survey focuses on regular B2B parcels shippers within the UK, tracking changes in service usage and customer perceptions of the leading carriers and their performance levels. For many senior executives in the express industry the study sets independent KPI’s for internal management initiatives and provides an invaluable competitor benchmark comparison which can work alongside in-house research data such as carriers’ own customer satisfaction surveys. This specialist business distribution survey is based on around 450 in depth telephone interviews with decision makers for UK domestic B2B deliveries of parcels 2 kg – 30 kg, in accordance with the Market Research Society Code of Conduct and supported by CATI software. The core sample is selected from a large database of known users of parcel distribution services. The interviewers are experienced market researchers who have been involved with this study for many years. Every year the survey content reflects developments in the market place and also allows for confidential questions from programme sponsors. In effect, The UK Domestic B2B Express Parcels Survey provides bespoke research at multi-client prices. The survey is based on fixed quotas for primary carrier ratings (i.e. carrier used most often), in order to guarantee robust results for each of the main carriers. A rating for the next most often used carrier is also captured, but no quota by carrier is set for them, i.e. these are random. The core questionnaire monitors strategic areas each year so as to ensure consistent trend data, however, new questions are sometimes added in order to measure market reactions to new developments. The main areas covered by the study include: 1.

UK Court Quashes New Zealander’s Murder Conviction

It was an unusual intervention by the Privy Council Judicial Committee, which at the height of the British Empire was a very powerful body but still retains important powers now as a last ditch court of appeals. A five-judge panel ruled in favor of Mark Lundy, who was convicted in New Zealand in 2002 after a jury decided he had attacked his wife Christine, 38, and his daughter Amber, 7, with a weapon similar to a tomahawk at the family home. Lundy received a mandatory life sentence and his appeal was dismissed by the New Zealand Court of Appeals later in 2002. He eventually had his lawyers bring the matter before the Privy Council, which had the authority to hear the appeal because New Zealand did not have its own Supreme Court until 2003. Lundy brought the case before the Privy Council committee in November, more than 10 years after losing his initial appeal in New Zealand. His lawyers argued that he suffered a “substantial miscarriage of justice” when he was initially convicted. They argued that the verdict was unreasonable and not supported by the evidence. The appeal was heard by four judges from Britain’s Supreme Court and one senior New Zealand judge. Lundy’s lawyers convinced the judges that fresh evidence should be considered in a new trial. Lundy is now in his mid-50s. The council said he should remain in prison in New Zealand until his bail request can be heard by the High Court there. Join the Discussion You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.